Italian copywriter

Looking for an Italian copywriter?

Please, don’t write to me now at lucabartoli@gmail.com
I prefer you to do it after sharing my ideas with you about Italian translation, Italian transcreation and Italian copywriting.

Are you searching for an Italian copywriter to utilize him as a translator?

Would you like to translate your website text or your advertising campaign into Italian?

No, you don’t want to. That’s totally wrong and I will not help you to make that terrible mistake. So, change website, look for someone else and forget my name. Oh, sorry I haven’t introduced myself yet: nice to meet you, I’m Luca Bartoli, an Italian copywriter since 2005.
Now, forget my name or keep reading and you will discover the right path.

Italians are so Italian.

That’s true. We are so different from every other people, we have a different sense of humour and think differently, we have a different “taste for words”. Maybe that’s why it is not so easy to learn to write and speak English (maybe I have made a couple of mistake in this page to prove it).
Anyway we’re different. Trust me, I have been Italian all my life.

So, what?

So don’t try to translate your website, your text or your advertising copy. The right way is to share your idea, your deep message, your purpose with an Italian copywriter and ask him to re-think and re-write them in his own language. The same language of your target, if they’re Italians.

Now, use the services of your Italian copywriter.

Now, you may write me an email to lucabartoli@gmail.com and explain me why are you looking for an Italian copywriter. If you have already tried to translate your text and you have a poor-working-translation, attach it to me in your email, together with the original text.

Italian transcreation versus italian translation

I hope I have been able to persuade you and that you will agree with me.
Anyway, if my words are not enough that’s wikipedia. Do you know anything more authorative?

Translation and transcreation are related processes, but they are not identical. Translation in the Western world has a centuries-long history and has been marked in practice by two “ideal” approaches – metaphrase (word-for-word translation) – and paraphrase (i.e. “say in other words”). Due to idiom and the wide variety of local usages, word-for-word translation has long been considered inadequate and the best translations take into account the vocabulary, grammar, syntax, idiom and local usage of the target audience while remaining faithful to the text, and context, of the original document.

Transcreation expands upon translation by focusing not so much on the literal text, but on discerning the emotional response by viewers in the source language and working to elicit the same response from viewers in the target market. It is about “taking a concept in one language, and completely recreating it in another.”

Absolute fidelity to the text is secondary to eliciting the desired emotional response by the target audience. Because differences between cultures are so numerous, eliciting the same emotional reaction may also necessitate changes in the context of the message.

Companies seeking to market a product across different languages and cultures have a spectrum of viable services from which to choose, ranging from mechanical translation on one end to the full resources of a multinational advertising agency on the other. Transcreation agencies, which add marketing and copywriting expertise to the translation process, lie at the center of this spectrum. The right choice depends on the nature of the message, how it will be used to reach the target language, the marketing objective of the advertiser and the financial resources of the company requiring the service.

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